£0.00

For Exclusive Offers & Latest Info:

4.9
Based on 119 reviews
js_loader

ArticlesExplore before you sail

Atlantic Ocean Crossing Update: December 02 2022

Well, the boats have made superb progress on their ARC 2022 crossing of the Atlantic.  However, about 900 miles short of St Lucia, the NE trade winds are beginning to vanish and before long we expect the boats to be becalmed. They have fuel for about 700nm of motoring, so they need wind! It looks like thee may semi drift for the next 3-4 days and then, (all sacrifices please to Neptune) some wind will return! You can see Bluejay’s position below (Starling is nearby, slightly more south) and th weather map with the BIG wind hole between them and St Lucia. Crew blogs from each boat also follow.

atlantic weather

Bluejay blog

Since the halfway mark there has been a definite change In the weather, where as we had managed to go almost 10 days without seeing or being effected by a squall it now feels like we are lucky if we go 10 minutes without either thinking about how me might dodge one, or how many reefs we will put in to ride it out.

We’ve been steadily getting closer to our destination these past few days with pretty reasonable progress being made each day in some nice consistent trade winds but the threat of a large wind hole between us and St Lucia is ever present and it looks like at some point in the next 24 hour after 12 days of sailing and nearly 2300nm we will have to fire up our engine to continue making progress towards our end destination.

Looking at the latest forecast we may be lucky and be able to squeeze another daylight spinnaker run in today (2/12) but then we look fairly committed to at least 3 days of motoring if not more.

There will still be plenty to do aboard as a break from sailing will mean things like winch servicing, rig checking & running rig maintenance can all be undertaken without too much distraction.

The happy hour lessons have continued with the subject matters taught extending to another refresher on reefing, a ‘plan’ being drawn out as to where all the lines are led and to which winch they ideally go to, to yet more celestial navigation and general revision of a lot of the theoretical and some of the practical elements of sailing a big practical element being spinnaker trimming and how to get the best out of it on different points of sail, in different wind speeds and sea states!

As of the 1300UT position report on 1/12 it suggested just 2nm separated us from Starling, with the position list being auto generated based on how close to St Lucia you are. This put Starling in 30th overall and us in 31st. Starling is yet to be visible from deck or on AIS but she must be close by and today’s position report will be more eagerly anticipated than normal!

Flying Fish tally stands at 34 and although progress averaged around the mid 190nm/day we have still yet to hit that illusive 200nm/day!

Starling blog

Day ten on the Starling, Bacon sandwhiches after the 4 am watch to start the day and acoffee to watch the sunrise.
Today is the half way party as we cross the mid-point in the Atlantic on our epic voyage. Fish Tacos forlunch made from the delicious Mahi Mahi we caught from the boat yesterday. Winds remain steady as theswell grew in the afternoon so that walls of blue water were the backdrop to Santa hats and the welcomereward of a cold beer. No dolphins today although they visted twice as we sailed dowm the African coast.We flew the spinnacker yesterday but actually hit our top speed of 16.7 knots surfing with twin headsail.Flying fish everyday, spectacular stars at night, thousands of miles of open ocean, who could want more.A race to beat the falling winds now so we make landfall in time for at least a beer before flights home.`
Simon, John and Nik, Starling B Watch – Dream Team , ARC 2022
Who we are

Blueco Holdings Ltd, t/a Rubicon 3 Adventure
20 – 22 Wenlock Road, London, N1 7GU

Need Ideas?

HOLIDAY PLANNER

Click here